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CONTENTS
Volume 4, Number 2, June 2012
 

Abstract
Air pluviation method is widely adopted for preparation of large, uniform and repeatable sand beds of desired densities for laboratory studies to simulate in-situ conditions and obtain test results which are highly reliable. This paper presents details of a portable traveling pluviator recently developed for model sand bed preparation. The pluviator essentially consisted of a hopper, orifice plates for varying deposition intensity, combination of flexible and rigid tubes for smooth travel of material, and a set of diffuser sieves to obtain uniformity of pluviated sand bed. It was observed that sand beds of lower relative density can be achieved by controlling height of fall, whereas, denser sand beds could be obtained by controlling deposition intensity. Uniformity of pluviated sand beds was evaluated using cone penetration test and at lower relative densities minor variation in density was observed with depth. With increase in relative density of sand bed higher repeatability of uniform pluviation was achieved.

Key Words
portable traveling pluviator; deposition intensity; height of fall; sand bed uniformity

Address
Dept. of Civil Engg., IIT Bombay, Mumbai 400076, India

Abstract
Focusing on the effect of excess pore pressure dissipation on liquefaction-induced ground deformation, a series of 1-g shaking table tests were conducted in a rigid soil container by use of saturated Toyoura sand, the relative density of which was 20-60%. These tests were subjected to the sinusoidal base shaking with step increased accelerations: 100, 200, 300 and 400 Gals for 2-4 seconds. Shaking table tests were done using either water or polymer fluid with more viscous than water, thus varying the sand permeability of model tests. Excess pore pressures, accelerations, settlements and lateral deformations were measured in each test. Test results are presented in this paper and the effect of sand permeability on liquefaction and liquefaction-induced ground deformation was discussed in detail.

Key Words
liquefaction; lateral flow; settlement; sand permeability; shaking table test.

Address
B. Wang : Graduate Student, Geo-disaster Prevention Laboratory, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering,
Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan
K. Zen, G.Q. Chen and K. Kasama : Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering,
Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan

Abstract
In this paper, the ultimate pullout capacity of a vertical plate strip anchors in cohesion-less soil is analyzed with the consideration of active and passive state of equilibrium in the soil. Kotter

Key Words
vertical anchor plates; cohesion-less soil; pullout capacity; kotter

Address
G.S. Kame : Research Scholar, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India
D.M. Dewaikar and Deepankar Choudhury : Faculty, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,
Powai, Mumbai - 400076, India

Abstract
The paper presents the results of identification, monotonous and cyclic triaxial tests on a potentially liquefiable soil from the Guadeloupe island. The material is a very soft clayey soil whose susceptibility to liquefaction is not clear when referring to index properties such as grain size distribution, plasticity, etc. The classifications found in the literature indicate that the material has rather a

Key Words
soft clayey soil; index properties; cyclic triaxial tests; post-liquefaction recovery.

Address
Siba Kheirbek-Saoud : Faculty of Civil Engineering, Tishreen University, Lattakia, Syria
Jean-Marie Fleureau : Laboratoire de Mecanique des Sols, Structures & Materiaux Ecole Centrale Paris & CNRS UMR 8579, 92295 Chatenay Malabry, France

Abstract
This paper presents the study of the effect of microorganism Bacillus pasteurii on the properties such as Atterbergs' limit and unconfined compressive strength of cohesive soils. The results of this study reveal that the liquid limit and plasticity index for all clay soils decreased and the unconfined compressive strength increased. Decrease in plasticity index is very high for Kuttanad clay followed by bentonite and laterite. The unconfined compressive strength increased for all the soils. The increase was high for Kuttanad soil and low for laterite soil. After 24 h of treatment the improvement in the soil properties is comparatively less. Besides the specific bacteria selected Bacillus pasteurii, other microorganisms may also be taking part in calcite precipitation thereby causing soil cementation. But the naturally present microorganisms alone cannot work on the calcite precipitation.

Key Words
atterberg's limit; unconfined compressive strength; microorganism; Bacillus pasteuri; stabilization; cohesive soil.

Address
Sheela Evangeline Yasodian, Lea Mathew, T.M. Anima and S.B. Seena : Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering Trivandrum, Thiruvananthapuram, India
Rakesh Kumar Dutta : Department of Civil Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur, Himachal Pradesh, India


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