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CONTENTS
Volume 4, Number 3, September 2016
 

Abstract
An experimental investigation was carried out on the strength and behavior plain and fiber reinforced geopolymer concrete beam column joints and the results were compared with plain and steel fiber reinforced conventional concrete beam column joints. The volume fraction of fibers used was 0.5%. A total of six Geopolymer concrete joints and four conventional concrete joints were cast and tested under reversed cyclic loading to evaluate the performance of the joints. First crack load, ultimate load, energy absorption capacity, energy dissipation capacity stiffness degradation and moment-curvature relation were evaluated from the test results. The comparison of test results revealed that the strength and behavior of plain and fiber reinforced geopolymer concrete beam column joints are marginally better than corresponding conventional concrete beam column joints.

Key Words
fiber; geopolymer; alkaline solution; energy dissipation; stiffness degradation

Address
S.Deepa Raj, Anumol Raju: Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering Trivandrum, Kerala, India
N. Ganesan: Department of Civil Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Calicut, Kerala, India
Ruby Abraham: Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Technology, Kottayam, Kerala, India

Abstract
This paper consists in a study of a new contructive sequence of road viaducts with Movable Scaffolding System (MSS) using numerical tools based on finite element method (FEM). Traditional and new sequences are being used in Spain to build viaducts with MSS. The new sequence permits an easier construction of one span per week but implies some other issues related to the need of two prestressing stages per span. In order to improve the efficiency of the new sequence by reducing the number of prestressing stages per span, two solutions are suggested in this study. Results show that the best solution is to introduce the 100% of the prestressing force at the self-supporting core in order to improve the road viaduct construction with movable scaffolding system by reducing execution time without increasing economic costs.

Key Words
movable scaffolding system; span by span casting; loop joint; critical path; transverse deflection; prestressing stage; self-supporting core

Address
José Ramón Díaz de Terán: Departamento de Estruturas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brasil
Vladimir Guilherme Haach: Departamento de Estruturas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brasil
José Turmo: Departamento de Ingeniería de la Construcción, Universidad Politécnica de Cataluña, Spain
Juan José Jorquera: Departamento de Ingeniería Minera, Geológica y Cartográfica, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, 30202 Cartagena, Murcia, Spain

Abstract
Today, application of additives to replace cement in order to improve concrete mixes is widely promoted. Micro-silica is among the best pozzolanic additives which can desirably contribute to the concrete characteristics provided it is used properly. In this paper, the effects of AP2RC and P1RB micro-silica gels on strength characteristics of normal concrete are investigated. Obtained results indicated that the application of these additives not only provided proper workability during construction, but also led to increased tensile, compressive and flexural strength values for the concrete during early ages as well as ultimate ones with the resulting reduction in the porosity lowering permeability of the micro-silica concrete. Furthermore, evaluation of microbial contamination of the mentioned gels showed the resultant contamination level to be within the permitted range.

Key Words
concrete admixture; concrete additive; silica fume gel; tensile strength; compressive strength; flexural strength; microbial contamination

Address
Seyed Mehdi Zahrai, Mohamad Hosein Mortezagholi: School of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, The University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
Erfan Najaf: Qaemshahr Islamic Azad University, Mazandaran, Iran

Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of recycled materials, namely, shredded scrap tire (SST), reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and class C fly ash (CFA) on compressive and tensile strength of concrete. Either SST or RAP was used as an aggregate replacement and class C fly ash (CFA) as Portland cement replacement for making concrete. A total of two types of SST and RAP, namely, chips and screenings were used for replacing coarse and fine aggregates, respectively. A total of 26 concrete mixes containing different replacement level of SST or RAP and CFA were designed. Using the mix designs, cylindrical specimens of concrete were prepared, cured in water tank, and tested for unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and indirect tensile strength (IDT) after 28 days. Experimental results showed aggregate substitution with SST decreased both UCS and IDT of concrete. On the contrary, replacement of aggregate with RAP improved UCS values. Specimens containing RAP chips resulted in concrete with higher IDT values as compared to corresponding specimens containing RAP screenings. Addition of 40% CFA was found to improve UCS values and degrade IDT values of SST containing specimens. Statistical analysis showed that IDT of SST and RAP can be estimated as approximately 13% and 12% of UCS, respectively.

Key Words
reclaimed asphalt pavement; shredded scrap tire; class C fly ash; Portland cement concrete; unconfined compressive strength; indirect tensile strength

Address
Pranshoo Solanki, Bharat Dasha: Department of Technology, College of Applied Science and Technology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 5100, Normal, Illinois, 61790, USA

Abstract
This paper presents a preliminary study on the influence of laterite soil replacing conventional fine aggregates on the strength properties of GGBS-blended-concrete. For this purpose, GGBS-blended-concrete samples with 40% GGBS, 60% Portland cement (PC), and locally available laterite soil was used. Laterite soils at 0, 25, 50 and 75% by weight were used in trails to replace the conventional fine aggregates. A control mix using only PC, river sand, course aggregates and water served as bench mark in comparing the performance of the composite concrete mix. Test blocks including 60 cubes for compression test; 20 cylinders for split tensile test; and 20 beams for flexural strength test were prepared in the laboratory. Results showed decreasing trends in strength parameters with increasing laterite content in GGBS-blended-concrete. 25% and 50% laterite replacement showed convincing strength (with small decrease) after 28 day curing, which is about 87-90% and 72-85% respectively in comparison to that achieved by the control mix.

Key Words
admixtures; concrete; construction materials; environmental effect; fly ash/slags; strengthening

Address
Ram Chandar Karra: Department of Mining Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, India
Mavinakere Eshwaraiah Raghunandan: Civil Engineering Discipline, School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, Bandar Sunway, Malaysia
B. Manjunath: Department of Civil Engineering, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal, India


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